In-situ monitoring of the pressure on wind turbine blades by self-powering nanocomposite base sensor

Research proposals

  • Research area

    Operations and remote autonomous monitoring

  • Institution

    Durham University

  • Research project

    In-situ monitoring of the pressure on wind turbine blades by self-powering nanocomposite base sensor

  • Lead supervisor

    Dr Mehdi Keshavarz-Hedayati (Assistant Professor – Engineering, Durham University)

  • Supervisory Team

    Professor Dagou Zeze (Engineering, Durham University)
    Dr Majid Bastankhah (Engineering, Durham University)

Project Description:

One of the main challenges in offshore wind energy is high costs of maintenance and inspection. This necessities novel techniques to provide real-time monitoring of wind turbine health and performance. Pressure distributions over wind turbine blades can provide essential information such as their inflow conditions, power efficiency and noise generation. Traditional pressure taps are the most common tools to quantify pressure distribution over turbine blade aerofoils. However, due to the destructive nature of this technique along with the lack of spatial and temporal resolutions, their use is mostly limited to laboratory research and not in utility-scale wind turbines. To tackle this limitation, we aim to design and develop a new class of pressure sensors based on nanotechnology. Within this multidisciplinary project, pressure variation over turbine blades can be quantified by measuring optically the spatial distribution of nanoparticles. The resulting sensor can be attached as a plaster to the surface of the blades while operates with stray light (self-powered) and allow in-site and real-time monitoring of pressure measurements. The realization of this innovative concept could revolutionize the monitoring process of the wind turbine blades, reduce operation costs and ultimately improve the offshore wind turbines efficiency.

Download all research proposals here